About Us

SAR History

Ever since America’s founding there have been Americans deeply concerned with preserving and maintaining the exceptional heritage of the American Revolution. Early on, efforts were made within the thirteen original states to preserve gravesites of fallen patriots, maintain battlegrounds where the blood of venerated patriots was spilled in the fight for liberty, and memorialize patriots who made Independence possible. Grateful descendants who inherited the freedom won by their ancestors sought to safeguard the precious gift of liberty, the true history and ideals of Americanism that were purchased with such an immeasurable price. In time, the descendants of American Revolution patriots formed organizations to perpetuate the memory of their revered patriot ancestors and America’s founding heritage. 1890 was the milestone year for both the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Sons of the American Revolution.

–Joseph Warren — The Suffolk Resolves 1774 — Journals of the Continental Congress, I, 31-36. Dr. Joseph Warren (1741-1775). A medical doctor who became president of the revolutionary Massachusetts Provincial Congress. Participated in the battles of Lexington and Concord–the “Shot Heard Round the World.” Commissioned a Major General, Warren chose to serve as a private soldier in the Battle of Bunker Hill where he was killed in combat. Warren’s first wife, Elizabeth Hooten, died in 1773. At the time of his death, he was engaged to be married to Miss Mercy Scollay. He left four small children orphaned.

 

Prior to 1890, a number of state American Revolution societies were formed. These were led by the Sons of Revolutionary Sires, which was organized July 4, 1876 in San Francisco, California. Acting on a resolution by the New Jersey Society, delegates from thirteen state societies met at Fraunces Tavern in New York City on April 30, 1889 in celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the inauguration of George Washington. It was here they formed the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution (National SAR) organization. Nearly one year later, on January 17, 1890 in Connecticut, the National SAR was officially incorporated. The Utah Society SAR (Utah SAR) was established in the Utah Territory on January 27, 1895. Later the National SAR was chartered by the United States Congress on June 6, 1906.

SAR Purpose

The National SAR was organized to be patriotic, historical, and educational to “perpetuate the memory of those who, by their services or sacrifices during the war of the American Revolution, achieved the independence of the American People.”

–John Adams, 1774, Works of John Adams, II, 366-368. John Adams (1735 – 1826) Signer of the Declaration of Independence, 1st Vice President of the United States, 2nd President of the United States.

Utah SAR – What We Do

Living in the West, we do not have access to Revolutionary War battlefields and monuments, or graves of the honored Revolutionary War dead to care for. Consequently our focus is in promoting patriotism, liberty, love for country, and excellence in the teaching of true American history. We sponsor and/or participate in patriotic observances to commemorate significant events in America’s founding such as The Declaration of Independence, the signing of the U.S. Constitution, George Washington’s birthday and The Shot Heard Round the World. We support educational endeavors with schools, civic groups, summer camps, Boy Scouts and others to keep alive the true history relating to the men and women who fought or gave service for Independence and the establishment of self-government and liberty.

The Utah SAR is a historical, educational, and patriotic non-profit, United States 501(c)3, corporation that seeks to maintain and extend:

  • The institutions of American freedom
  • An appreciation for true patriotism and liberty
  • A respect for our national symbols
  • The value of American citizenship
  • The unifying force of e pluribus unum that has created, from the people of many nations, one nation and one people–Americans.

We do this by perpetuating the memory of the patriotism, courage, sacrifice, and triumph of the men and women who achieved the independence of the American people in the belief that these stories are universal ones of man’s eternal struggle against tyranny, relevant to all time, and will inspire and strengthen each succeeding generation as it too is called upon to defend our freedoms on the battlefield and in our public institutions.

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